Home
Search results “Monopulse principles and techniques”
Phased Array Antennas
 
05:01
This video gives a high-level overview of the basic operating principles of phased array antennas, with visual examples of how they operate illustrated with ripples in water. This is our (Michael Sinanis, Jenna Hickle, and myself) submission for the IMS 2015 YouTube/YouKu video competition.
Views: 122324 Mark Hickle
Conical scanning, RADAR Tracking in Microwave and Radar engineering by engineering funda
 
10:50
In this video, i have explained Conical scanning in RADAR tracking with following aspects. 1. Conical scanning 2. Basics of Conical scanning 3. Block Diagram of Conical scanning 4. Working of Conical scanning 6. Advantages of Conical scanning 7. Disadvantages of Conical scanning 8. Applications of Conical scanning 9. Calculation of Angle of Error in Conical scanning For free materials of different engineering subjects use my android application named Engineering Funda with following link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.viaviapp.ENG_Funda Above Android application of Engineering Funda provides following services: 1. Free Materials (GATE exam, Class Notes, Interview questions) 2. Technical Forum 3. Technical discussion 4. Inquiry For more details and inquiry on above topic visit website of Engineering Funda with given link: http://www.engineeringfunda.co.in Engineering Funda channel is all about Engineering and Technology. Here this video is a part of Microwave Engineering and RADAR Engineering.
Views: 12321 Engineering Funda
Tracking Radar
 
59:18
Project Name: e-Content generation and delivery management for student –Centric learning Project Investigator:Prof. D V L N Somayajulu
Views: 23621 Vidya-mitra
Secondary Surveylance Radar (SSR) -- PILOT TRAINING
 
07:56
Secondary surveillance radar (SSR) is a radar system used in air traffic control (ATC), that not only detects and measures the position of aircraft i.e. range and bearing, but also requests additional information from the aircraft itself such as its identity and altitude. Unlike primary radar systems that measure only the range and bearing of targets by detecting reflected radio signals, SSR relies on targets equipped with a radar transponder, that replies to each interrogation signal by transmitting a response containing encoded data. SSR is based on the military identification friend or foe (IFF) technology originally developed during World War II, therefore the two systems are still compatible. Monopulse secondary surveillance radar (MSSR), Mode S, TCAS and ADS-B are similar modern methods of secondary surveillance.
Views: 50326 Aviation Weekly
4.1 Antenna Basics
 
12:55
This video was made for a junior electromagnetics course in electrical engineering at Bucknell University, USA. The video is designed to be used as the out-of-the-classroom component and combined with active learning exercises in class. This video covers some vary basic facts about antennas, or devices that are designed to couple electrical energy from circuits into waves propagating through free space.
Views: 170950 kridnix
Detection of Targets in Noise and Pulse Compression Techniques  lec 5
 
01:04:39
Intro to Radar tutorials. Original source at https://www.ll.mit.edu/workshops/education/videocourses/introradar/index.html This falls under fair use since the purpose is for education and simply making the content easier to watch than using the original site. Lecture notes for course at https://drive.google.com/open?id=15IlNynlvUwqPMk5hJNvB9Qj1wCesH1o7
Views: 5102 Engineery
Introduction to Radar Systems – Lecture 5 – Detection of Signals; Part 2
 
39:28
Detection of Signals in Noise and Pulse Compression
CFAR Demonstration
 
01:51
This is a demonstration of Adaptive Gain used in Radar called CFAR.
Views: 456 jdlmgdbb
Radiation pattern of the antenna of a 24 GHz and an 80 GHz FMCW Radar Level Transmitter
 
02:29
Radiation pattern of the antenna: The radiation pattern of a radar system results from the combination of the frequency and the antenna diameter. In general, the following applies: With the same antenna diameter, the beam angle decreases proportionally when increasing the frequency. At the same frequency, the beam angle decreases proportionally when increasing the antenna diameter. The illuminated circles in the video illustrate the areas detected by the respective radar system on the product surface. It should be noted that radar beams spread out conically from the antenna. For the selected system configurations 24GHz with an 80mm horn antenna and 80GHz with a 40mm lens antenna, these areas are approximately identical. In this comparison, the radar beam can be demonstrated by using metal rings. In both systems, the radar beam travels through the ring opening. As a result, the rings are hardly visible in the reception signal. If the ring opening is reduced, the radar beam hits the metal surface and the ring is clearly visible in the received radar signal. If such a disturbance is caused, for example, by installations in tanks, there are two possibilities for optimization: Firstly, the disturbance can be hidden by recording an empty spectrum. For this purpose, the received radar signal of the empty tank is recorded and stored into the memory of the radar device and then subtracted from each subsequent measurement. However, the energy reflected at the rings means a reduction of the residual energy for the actual measurement of the product surface. Second, the use of a larger antenna can reduce the beam angle. This results in the following advantages: The radar beam angle no longer touches the ring surface, The complete energy radar signal is available for surface detection. Even with the 24GHz system, an increase in the antenna diameter would achieve a similar effect, but a significantly larger antenna would be necessary. Watch the whole video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydJYsOaOe3I
Views: 447 KROHNE Group
Mono:Pulse - Hausburg // SM025
 
06:11
Download the album for free at http://www.symbiont-music.com/symbiont-music.html or https://soundcloud.com/monopulse Artist: Mono:Pulse Title: Require Album: Blue Chapter Label: symbiont-music Format: 320 kbit/s, mp3, CBR Cat.No.: SM025 Releasedate: 24.11.2011 Written & Produced by Mono:Pulse Artwork: Mica Video: Fuchsberg Mastering: Electoy The project Mono:Pulse was initiated by two artists who derived their musical influences in different areas of electronic music. Far from practical function, they are going for a whole different way of getting the message across: Music as an organic experience and a living atmosphere. The downbeat project buried themselves inside their studios in the beginning of 2011 for this journey of no genre boundaries through the world of electronic music. The multiple different places of production are yet another element of the organic matter of this album. In their as a process understood work, diversity has a double emphasis put on it. In that way they achieved mixtures from synthetic and musical-acoustical sounds in a variety of depths with its origins as far spread as Jazz, HipHop, Dubstep and Techno. Intensity, expressionism as well as the contrast of energy and indulgence are some of the characteristics of the two artist.
Views: 219 Pumpthevalium
MTI and pulsed doppler radar
 
51:16
Project Name: e-Content generation and delivery management for student –Centric learning Project Investigator:Prof. D V L N Somayajulu
Views: 28610 Vidya-mitra
ATPL Training / Radio Navigation #19 Radar - Secondary Surveillance Radar
 
18:11
Airline Transport Pilot Licence Training (CBT) Next Lesson: #20 Radar - Mode S Support the Channel and Subscribe!!
Fundamentals of Radar
 
53:59
Project Name: e-Content generation and delivery management for student –Centric learning Project Investigator:Prof. D V L N Somayajulu
Views: 76979 Vidya-mitra
MTI RADAR, Moving Target Indicator RADAR in Microwave and RADAR Engineering by Engineering Funda
 
14:37
In this video, i have explained MTI RADAR system with following aspects. 1. MTI RADAR system 2. Block diagram of MTI RADAR system 3. Working of MTI RADAR system 4. Applications of MTI RADAR system 5. Basics of MTI RADAR system 6. Delay Line Canceller in MTI RADAR system 7. Importance of Delay Line Canceller in MTI RADAR system For free materials of different engineering subjects use my android application named Engineering Funda with following link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.viaviapp.ENG_Funda Above Android application of Engineering Funda provides following services: 1. Free Materials (GATE exam, Class Notes, Interview questions) 2. Technical Forum 3. Technical discussion 4. Inquiry For more details and inquiry on above topic visit website of Engineering Funda with given link: http://www.engineeringfunda.co.in Engineering Funda channel is all about Engineering and Technology. Here this video is a part of Microwave Engineering.
Views: 21885 Engineering Funda
Doppler RADAR or Continuous wave RADAR in RADAR Engineering by Engineering Funda
 
07:11
In this video, i have explained Doppler RADAR or Continuous wave RADAR with following aspects. 1. Doppler RADAR or Continuous wave RADAR 2. Block diagram of Doppler RADAR or Continuous wave RADAR 3. Working of Doppler RADAR or Continuous wave RADAR 4. Doppler Effect 5. Applications of Doppler RADAR or Continuous wave RADAR 6. Basics of Doppler RADAR or Continuous wave RADAR For free materials of different engineering subjects use my android application named Engineering Funda with following link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.viaviapp.ENG_Funda Above Android application of Engineering Funda provides following services: 1. Free Materials (GATE exam, Class Notes, Interview questions) 2. Technical Forum 3. Technical discussion 4. Inquiry For more details and inquiry on above topic visit website of Engineering Funda with given link: http://www.engineeringfunda.co.in Engineering Funda channel is all about Engineering and Technology. Here this video is a part of Microwave Engineering.
Views: 35965 Engineering Funda
Linear FM Pulse Compression
 
00:31
Animation from "How to Speak Radar" (C) 2014 by Arnold Acker http://www.RadarCourse.Com
Views: 4446 PyroJim2007
Radar Transmitter and Reciver
 
01:27:55
Project Name: e-Content generation and delivery management for student –Centric learning Project Investigator:Prof. D V L N Somayajulu
Views: 5262 Vidya-mitra
Pulsed RADAR system by Engineering Funda (Microwave Engineering, RADAR Engineering, Microwave, RADAR
 
11:13
In this video, i have explained Pulsed RADAR system with following aspects. 1. Pulsed RADAR system 2. Block diagram of Pulsed RADAR system 3. Working of Pulsed RADAR system 4. Applications of Pulsed RADAR system 5. Basics of Pulsed RADAR system For free materials of different engineering subjects use my android application named Engineering Funda with following link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.viaviapp.ENG_Funda Above Android application of Engineering Funda provides following services: 1. Free Materials (GATE exam, Class Notes, Interview questions) 2. Technical Forum 3. Technical discussion 4. Inquiry For more details and inquiry on above topic visit website of Engineering Funda with given link: http://www.engineeringfunda.co.in Engineering Funda channel is all about Engineering and Technology. Here this video is a part of Microwave Engineering.
Views: 30099 Engineering Funda
Direction finding of radio sources
 
03:33
This video presents the design and findings of a Radio Direction Finding (RDF) system used to find the Angle of Arrival (AOA). Phase Interferometry, which uses the phase difference between antennas and trigonometry to calculate the AOA, is the implemented method. It is chosen due to its accuracy and usage of only two antennas. The system is limited to a range between -90 :90 degrees. Two monopole antennas, which retrieve frequencies between 80-100 MHz, are implemented to extract the desired radio signals. The USRP1 in combination with GNU Radio are used to perform the signal conditioning, thereby isolating the desired frequency from noise and interference. The signal processing is performed in Python to calculate the AOA. The system has a 6.83% error with a 12.4-degree deviation from the desired angle. It is however noted that in the range of -60:60 degrees, the average deviation is 6-degrees which multiplies by a factor of approximately 4 to a deviation of 26.5 degrees in the range -90:-75 and 75:90 degrees. This is because there is a non-linear relationship between the electronic and mechanical angle. Post processing statistical methods such as the Maximum Likelihood (ML) Method or Eigenspace Methods and or introducing a third antenna to the system can improve accuracy significantly and increase the range of the system to 360-degrees. Student names: Sheena Philip and Erlé Minnaar Supervisor name: Prof Jaco Versfeld
Range Height Indicator (RHI) (RADAR Display) in Control Engineering by Engineering Funda
 
06:23
In this video, i have explained Range Height Indicator (RHI) Basics, Working and Applications. For free materials of different engineering subjects use my android application named Engineering Funda with following link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.viaviapp.ENG_Funda Above Android application of Engineering Funda provides following services: 1. Free Materials (GATE exam, Class Notes, Interview questions) 2. Technical Forum 3. Technical discussion 4. Inquiry For more details and inquiry on above topic visit website of Engineering Funda with given link: http://www.engineeringfunda.co.in Engineering Funda channel is all about Engineering and Technology. Here this video is a part of Microwave Engineering
Views: 3603 Engineering Funda
MTI Radar in Hindi working,block diagram, Working principle and application.
 
06:10
Hi friends in this video i will discuss about pulse radar. Working with block diagram. Application.
Views: 2347 Fun2 L
Radar Scanning Pattern
 
00:25
Typically, a National Weather Service's NEXRAD (NEXt Generation RADar) WSR-88D system radar antenna is pointed at a low angle, sends out a pulse for a fraction of a second, and then "listens" to receive any returning energy or "scattering." Then the radar rotates an incremental amount and repeats the process. Once the radar completes an entire revolution, the antenna elevation angle is increased and the process is repeated. Radars transmit and listen so quickly that they can scan much of the nearby atmosphere in about 5 minutes. To learn more about NEXRAD and RADAR basics, see the MetEd lesson, Radar Meteorology Course, Weather Radar Fundamentals (https://www.meted.ucar.edu/training_module.php?id=960).
RADAR Block Diagram (Bistatic RADAR & Monostatic RADAR)
 
07:05
In this video, i have explained different RADAR systems with following aspects. 1. Types of RADAR 2. Block diagram of Bistatic RADAR 3. Working of Bistatic RADAR 4. Block diagram of Monostatic RADAR 5. Working of Monostatic RADAR 6. Comparison of Bistatic RADAR and Bistatic RADAR For free materials of different engineering subjects use my android application named Engineering Funda with following link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.viaviapp.ENG_Funda Above Android application of Engineering Funda provides following services: 1. Free Materials (GATE exam, Class Notes, Interview questions) 2. Technical Forum 3. Technical discussion 4. Inquiry For more details and inquiry on above topic visit website of Engineering Funda with given link: http://www.engineeringfunda.co.in Engineering Funda channel is all about Engineering and Technology. Here this video is a part of Microwave Engineering.
Views: 30779 Engineering Funda
What does monopulse radar mean?
 
00:39
What does monopulse radar mean? A spoken definition of monopulse radar. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/monopulse_radar Text to Speech powered by TTS-API.COM
Views: 2142 What Does That Mean?
A Scope Display (RADAR Display) by Engineering Funda (RADAR Engineering, Microwave Engineering)
 
07:07
In this video, i have explained A-scope Display with following aspects. 1. A-Scope Display 2. basics of A-Scope Display 3. Working of A-Scope Display 4. Identification of Target by A-Scope Display 5. Applications of A-Scope Display For free materials of different engineering subjects use my android application named Engineering Funda with following link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.viaviapp.ENG_Funda Above Android application of Engineering Funda provides following services: 1. Free Materials (GATE exam, Class Notes, Interview questions) 2. Technical Forum 3. Technical discussion 4. Inquiry For more details and inquiry on above topic visit website of Engineering Funda with given link: http://www.engineeringfunda.co.in Engineering Funda channel is all about Engineering and Technology. Here this video is a part of Microwave Engineering.
Views: 11484 Engineering Funda
Mirage
 
01:51
The self-defense suite ‘Mirage’ is intended for armored vehicles (artillery, marine) protection against all types of onboard radar stations with synthetic aperture and Doppler beam sharpening, operating in any surface surveillance (ground-mapping) mode (side-looking surveillance, forward-sidelooking, sector, telescopic (beam-like); the forward-looking one, employing monopulse antenna systems).
Views: 2028 DefenseInitiatives
Radar: "Radar: Technical Principles: Indicators" Part 1 of 3 (1946) US Army Training Film
 
14:51
A US Army training film explaining the basics of Radar systems for radar operators. US Army training film TF11-138 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radar Radar is an object-detection system which uses radio waves to determine the range, altitude, direction, or speed of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft, ships, spacecraft, guided missiles, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. The radar dish or antenna transmits pulses of radio waves or microwaves which bounce off any object in their path. The object returns a tiny part of the wave's energy to a dish or antenna which is usually located at the same site as the transmitter. Radar was developed in secret in nations across the world just before and during World War II. The term RADAR was coined in 1941 by the United States Navy as an acronym for radio detection and ranging. The term radar has since entered English and other languages as the common noun radar, losing all capitalization... As early as 1886, Heinrich Hertz showed that radio waves could be reflected from solid objects. In 1895 Alexander Popov, a physics instructor at the Imperial Russian Navy school in Kronstadt, developed an apparatus using a coherer tube for detecting distant lightning strikes... The German Christian Huelsmeyer was the first to use radio waves to detect "the presence of distant metallic objects". In 1904 he demonstrated the feasibility of detecting a ship in dense fog but not its distance. He obtained a patent for his detection device in April 1904 and later a patent for a related amendment for determining the distance to the ship. He also got a British patent on September 23, In August 1917 Nikola Tesla outlined a concept for primitive radar units. He stated, - "...by their [standing electromagnetic waves] use we may produce at will, from a sending station, an electrical effect in any particular region of the globe; [with which] we may determine the relative position or course of a moving object, such as a vessel at sea, the distance traversed by the same, or its speed." In 1922 A. Hoyt Taylor and Leo C. Young, researchers working with the U.S. Navy, discovered that when radio waves were broadcast at 60 MHz it was possible to determine the range and bearing of nearby ships in the Potomac River. Despite Taylor's suggestion that this method could be used in low visibility, the Navy did not immediately continue the work. Serious investigation began eight years later after the discovery that radar could be used to track airplanes. Before the Second World War, researchers in France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States, independently and in great secrecy, developed technologies that led to the modern version of radar. Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa followed prewar Great Britain, and Hungary had similar developments during the war. In 1934 the Frenchman Émile Girardeau stated he was building an obstacle-locating radio apparatus "conceived according to the principles stated by Tesla" and obtained a patent for a working system, a part of which was installed on the Normandie liner in 1935. During the same year, the Soviet military engineer P.K.Oschepkov, in collaboration with Leningrad Electrophysical Institute, produced an experimental apparatus, RAPID, capable of detecting an aircraft within 3 km of a receiver... Full radar evolved as a pulsed system, and the first such elementary apparatus was demonstrated in December 1934 by American Robert M. Page, working at the Naval Research Laboratory. The following year, the United States Army successfully tested a primitive surface to surface radar to aim coastal battery search lights at night. This was followed by a pulsed system demonstrated in May 1935 by Rudolf Kühnhold and the firm GEMA in Germany and then one in June 1935 by an Air Ministry team led by Robert A. Watson Watt in Great Britain. Later, in 1943, Page greatly improved radar with the monopulse technique that was used for many years in most radar applications...
Views: 38 Old Movies Reborn
Basics of pulsed radar (relating it to an everyday experience)
 
04:42
2014 IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques YouTube/YouKu Video Competition Theme: Microwave Education Objective: To create an educational video about a fundamental microwave engineering principle, relating said principle to an everyday experience.
Views: 2916 Michael Grady
Radar: Technical Principles: Mechanics (1946) US Army Training Film
 
21:10
A US Army training film explaining the basics of Radar systems for radar repairmen. US Army training film TF11-1386 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radar Radar is an object-detection system which uses radio waves to determine the range, altitude, direction, or speed of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft, ships, spacecraft, guided missiles, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. The radar dish or antenna transmits pulses of radio waves or microwaves which bounce off any object in their path. The object returns a tiny part of the wave's energy to a dish or antenna which is usually located at the same site as the transmitter. Radar was developed in secret in nations across the world just before and during World War II. The term RADAR was coined in 1941 by the United States Navy as an acronym for radio detection and ranging. The term radar has since entered English and other languages as the common noun radar, losing all capitalization... As early as 1886, Heinrich Hertz showed that radio waves could be reflected from solid objects. In 1895 Alexander Popov, a physics instructor at the Imperial Russian Navy school in Kronstadt, developed an apparatus using a coherer tube for detecting distant lightning strikes. The next year, he added a spark-gap transmitter. In 1897, while testing this in communicating between two ships in the Baltic Sea, he took note of an interference beat caused by the passage of a third vessel. In his report, Popov wrote that this phenomenon might be used for detecting objects, but he did nothing more with this observation. The German Christian Huelsmeyer was the first to use radio waves to detect "the presence of distant metallic objects". In 1904 he demonstrated the feasibility of detecting a ship in dense fog but not its distance. He obtained a patent for his detection device in April 1904 and later a patent for a related amendment for determining the distance to the ship. He also got a British patent on September 23, In August 1917 Nikola Tesla outlined a concept for primitive radar units. He stated, - "...by their [standing electromagnetic waves] use we may produce at will, from a sending station, an electrical effect in any particular region of the globe; [with which] we may determine the relative position or course of a moving object, such as a vessel at sea, the distance traversed by the same, or its speed." In 1922 A. Hoyt Taylor and Leo C. Young, researchers working with the U.S. Navy, discovered that when radio waves were broadcast at 60 MHz it was possible to determine the range and bearing of nearby ships in the Potomac River. Despite Taylor's suggestion that this method could be used in low visibility, the Navy did not immediately continue the work. Serious investigation began eight years later after the discovery that radar could be used to track airplanes. Before the Second World War, researchers in France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States, independently and in great secrecy, developed technologies that led to the modern version of radar... In 1934 the Frenchman Émile Girardeau stated he was building an obstacle-locating radio apparatus "conceived according to the principles stated by Tesla" and obtained a patent for a working system, a part of which was installed on the Normandie liner in 1935. During the same year, the Soviet military engineer P.K.Oschepkov, in collaboration with Leningrad Electrophysical Institute, produced an experimental apparatus, RAPID, capable of detecting an aircraft within 3 km of a receiver... Full radar evolved as a pulsed system, and the first such elementary apparatus was demonstrated in December 1934 by American Robert M. Page, working at the Naval Research Laboratory. The following year, the United States Army successfully tested a primitive surface to surface radar to aim coastal battery search lights at night. This was followed by a pulsed system demonstrated in May 1935 by Rudolf Kühnhold and the firm GEMA in Germany and then one in June 1935 by an Air Ministry team led by Robert A. Watson Watt in Great Britain. Later, in 1943, Page greatly improved radar with the monopulse technique that was used for many years in most radar applications...
Views: 33 Old Movies Reborn
Radar: Technical Principles: Indicators (1946) US Army Training Film TF11-1387
 
44:03
A US Army training film explaining the basics of Radar systems for radar operators. US Army training film TF11-1387 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radar Radar is an object-detection system which uses radio waves to determine the range, altitude, direction, or speed of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft, ships, spacecraft, guided missiles, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. The radar dish or antenna transmits pulses of radio waves or microwaves which bounce off any object in their path. The object returns a tiny part of the wave's energy to a dish or antenna which is usually located at the same site as the transmitter. Radar was secretly developed by several nations before and during World War II. The term RADAR was coined in 1941 by the United States Navy as an acronym for RAdio Detection And Ranging. The term radar has since entered English and other languages as the common noun radar, losing all capitalization. The modern uses of radar are highly diverse, including air traffic control, radar astronomy, air-defense systems, antimissile systems; marine radars to locate landmarks and other ships; aircraft anticollision systems; ocean surveillance systems, outer space surveillance and rendezvous systems; meteorological precipitation monitoring; altimetry and flight control systems; guided missile target locating systems; and ground-penetrating radar for geological observations. High tech radar systems are associated with digital signal processing and are capable of extracting useful information from very high noise levels. Other systems similar to radar make use of other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. One example is "lidar", which uses visible light from lasers rather than radio waves... History As early as 1886, Heinrich Hertz showed that radio waves could be reflected from solid objects... In 1922 A. Hoyt Taylor and Leo C. Young, researchers working with the U.S. Navy, discovered that when radio waves were broadcast at 60 MHz it was possible to determine the range and bearing of nearby ships in the Potomac River.. Before the Second World War, researchers in France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States, independently and in great secrecy, developed technologies that led to the modern version of radar. Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa followed prewar Great Britain, and Hungary had similar developments during the war... Full radar evolved as a pulsed system, and the first such elementary apparatus was demonstrated in December 1934 by the American Robert M. Page, working at the Naval Research Laboratory. The following year, the United States Army successfully tested a primitive surface-to-surface radar to aim coastal battery search lights at night. This was followed by a pulsed system demonstrated in May 1935 by Rudolf Kühnhold and the firm GEMA in Germany and then one in June 1935 by an Air Ministry team led by Robert A. Watson Watt in Great Britain. Later, in 1943, Page greatly improved radar with the monopulse technique that was used for many years in most radar applications. The British were the first to fully exploit radar as a defence against aircraft attack... A radar system has a transmitter that emits radio waves called radar signals in predetermined directions. When these come into contact with an object they are usually reflected or scattered in many directions. Radar signals are reflected especially well by materials of considerable electrical conductivity—especially by most metals, by seawater, by wet land, and by wetlands. Some of these make the use of radar altimeters possible. The radar signals that are reflected back towards the transmitter are the desirable ones that make radar work. If the object is moving either toward or away from the transmitter, there is a slight equivalent change in the frequency of the radio waves, caused by the Doppler effect.
Views: 58 Old Movies Reborn
Frequency Scanning Array basics & working in Antenna and Wave Propagation by Engineering Funda
 
10:55
In this video, i have explained Frequency Scanning Array by following outlines: 1. Frequency Scanning Array 2. Basics of Frequency Scanning Array 3. Radiation of Frequency Scanning Array 4. Example of Frequency Scanning Array 6. Advantages of Frequency Scanning Array 7. Disadvantages of Frequency Scanning Array 8. Applications of Frequency Scanning Array For free materials of different engineering subjects use my android application named Engineering Funda with following link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.viaviapp.ENG_Funda Above Android application of Engineering Funda provides following services: 1. Free Materials (GATE exam, Class Notes, Interview questions) 2. Technical Forum 3. Technical discussion 4. Inquiry For more details and inquiry on above topic visit website of Engineering Funda with given link: http://www.engineeringfunda.co.in Engineering Funda channel is all about Engineering and Technology. Here this video is a part of Antenna and Wave Propagation.
Views: 1776 Engineering Funda
Moving Target Indicator (MTI) Radar
 
11:08
Dr.Rupali J.Shelke Associate Professor Department of Electronics Engg. Walchand Institute of Technology ,Solapur
Automotive Radar – An Overview on State-of-the-Art Technology
 
01:00:41
Radar systems are a key technology of modern vehicle safety & comfort systems. Without doubt it will only be the symbiosis of Radar, Lidar and camera-based sensor systems which can enable advanced autonomous driving functions soon. Several next generation car models are such announced to have up to 10 radar sensors per vehicle, allowing for the generation of a radar-based 360° surround view necessary for advanced driver assistance as well as semi-autonomous operation. Hence the demand from the automotive industry for high-precision, multi-functional radar systems is higher than ever before, and the increased requirements on functionality and sensor capabilities lead to research and development activities in the field of automotive radar systems in both industry and academic worlds. Current automotive radar technology is almost exclusively based on the principle of frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar, which has been well known for several decades. However, together with an increase of hardware capabilities such as higher carrier frequencies, modulation bandwidths and ramp slopes, as well as a scaling up of simultaneously utilized transmit and receive channels with independent modulation features, new degrees of freedom have been added to traditional FMCW radar system design and signal processing. The anticipated presentation will accordingly introduce the topic with a review on the fundamentals of radar and FMCW radar. After introducing the system architecture of traditional and modern automotive FMCW radar sensors, with e.g. insights into the concepts of distributed or centralized processing and sensor data fusion, the presentation will dive into the details of fast-chirp FMCW processing – the modulation mode which is used by the vast majority of current automotive FMCW radar systems. Starting with the fundamentals of target range and velocity estimation based on the radar data matrix, the spatial dimension available using modern single-input multiple-output (SIMO) and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar systems will be introduced and radar processing based on the radar data cube is discussed. Of interest is the topic of angular resolution – one of the key drawbacks which e.g. render Lidar systems superior to radar in some situations. Consequently, traditional and modern methods for direction of arrival estimation in FMCW radar systems are presented, starting from traditional mono pulse-like algorithms to modern frameworks for super -resolution DoA estimation. The presentation will then introduce the great challenge of FMCW radar system interference. While FMCW radar interference is a challenge which can be handled using adaptive signal processing in today’s systems, it will become a severe problem with the increasing number of radar-sensors equipped vehicles in dense traffic situations in the near future and a solution to the expected increase in interference is still an open question. It is this problem of interference, together with some added functionality, which motivated the proposal of alternative radar waveforms such as pseudo-random or orthogonal-frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar for automotive radar systems. Although not yet of great interest from an industrial perspective, the fundamentals and capabilities of both technologies will be introduced in the remainder of the anticipated presentation.
Radar clutter and Chaff lec 7
 
01:08:04
Intro to Radar tutorials. Original source at https://www.ll.mit.edu/workshops/education/videocourses/introradar/index.html This falls under fair use since the purpose is for education and simply making the content easier to watch than using the original site. Lecture notes for course at https://drive.google.com/open?id=15IlNynlvUwqPMk5hJNvB9Qj1wCesH1o7
Views: 1707 Engineery
Range-gating with narrow gate
 
00:16
- Active Imaging Night vision camera - For more information, visit http://www.obzerv.com
Views: 2982 ObzervTechnologies

Cigar shops in indianapolis
Pools in pasadena
Alexandria homes for rent
Bike store virginia beach
Skis pawn shop columbus ne