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Finding the molecular formula from a mass spectrum
 
17:33
This is the first in a series of 3 lessons about the interpretation of electron impact mass spectra. This video was created for a university course in instrumental analysis in chemistry. Spectra were taken from http://webbook.nist.gov/chemistry/ and used with permission. The isotope calculator mentioned in the video can be found at http://www.sisweb.com/mstools/isotope.htm
Views: 154754 Gary Mabbott
MCAT Interpreting Mass Spectrometry
 
13:07
Check out more MCAT lectures and prep materials on our website: https://premedhqdime.com Analytical Techniques Part 9 - How to Interpret Mass Spectrometry Data This topic is no longer tested on the MCAT. Before watching this one, make sure to watch the Introduction to Mass Spectroscopy video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sRqoAy9YJI
Views: 78139 MCAT Prep by PremedHQ
Mass Spectrometry
 
38:24
This organic chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into mass spectrometry. It explains how to match the correct molecular fragments with the corresponding m/z peaks in the mass spectrum. This video discusses the mass spectrum of ketones, alcohols, alkanes, and alkyl halides with bromine and chlorine. It discusses the difference between the base peak and the parent peak. It also shows the effect of isotopes such as Carbon-13 on the mass spectrum. It also mentions the M+2 peak for isotopes of chlorine and bromine. Finally, it discusses the mclafferty rearrangement which occurs following the electron ionization of ketones. Here are some other useful videos: H NMR Spectroscopy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhiiIKpm5Xw&t=159s IR Spectroscopy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Xi5ZVbbftI Organic Chemistry 1 Final Exam Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQIlAfjR2f4 Organic Chemistry 2 Final Exam Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5NaUdVfAOc
Mass spectrometry part 4 : Graph features and analysis
 
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For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 59575 Shomu's Biology
Mass Spectrometry
 
04:51
Who wants to smash molecules into little bits? A mass spectrometer does, that's who. This is a good technique for corroborating molecular structure, because we can make sure the puzzle pieces fit the right way. Check it out! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 141918 Professor Dave Explains
How2: Interpret a mass spectrum
 
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Shows you how to get the information out of a mass spectrum and use it to help suggest the identity of an unidentified molecule
Views: 279365 Andrew Crookell
Interpreting M+ Peaks in Mass Spectrometry
 
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Visit our website for the notes of this lecture: https://knowbeetutoring.wordpress.com/ Get private tutoring from anywhere in the world, via your computer, from this instructor. He offers help in Organic Chemistry, General Chemistry, Physics, MCAT, PCAT, and DAT. SUBMIT AN MCAT PROBLEM AND I WILL SHOW YOU HOW TO SOLVE IT VIA VIDEO. FREE. VISIT WEBSITE FOR DETAILS. https://knowbeetutoring.wordpress.com/
Views: 104707 Knowbee
Mass Spectrometry: Steps to Analyzing a Mass Spec for Molecular Formula
 
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Looks at how to diagram a mass spec to gain the most reliable information concerning finding the molecular weight, major fragments, and the molecular formula. Fully worked example included.
Simple explanation of the Mass Spectrometer.
 
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This short flash animation video outlines the basic principles of a Mass Spectrometer. The key points illustrated are: TINY AMOUNTS OF SAMPLE ARE REQUIRED - THE SAMPLE MUST BE CHANGED TO A VAPOUR - ONE OR MORE ELECTRONS ARE REMOVED FROM ATOMS OR MOLECULES TO PRODUCE +VE IONS - AN ION-ACCELERATING ELECTRIC FIELD, TOGETHER WITH PLATES WITH SLITS, FORMS A NARROW BEAM - A MAGNETIC FIELD DEFLECTS THE ION BEAM - THE ION WITH THE GREATEST MASS AND SMALLEST CHARGE (1+) IS DEFLECTED THE LEAST - IONS HIT A DETECTION PLATE PRODUCING A TINY ELECTRICAL CURRENT THAT IS APPLIFIED - THE MORE IONS OF A SPECIFIC MASS:CHARGE RATIO THE GREATER THE CURRENT AND TALLER THE PEAK
Views: 348608 FranklyChemistry
A Level Chemistry Isotopes and the mass spectrometer
 
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A Level Chemistry Isotopes and the mass spectrometer You can watch all my videos, fully indexed at www.freesciencelessons.co.uk In this video, we explore isotopes, looking at the definition and the idea of relative abundance. We then look at how the time-of-flight mass spectrometer works and how to interpret a mass spectrum. You can expect to see this on your exam. You need to download a copy of the Periodic Table for your exam board from the links below: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/chemistry/AQA-7404-SDB.PDF http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/75088-datasheet-specimen.pdf http://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/A%20Level/Chemistry/2015/Specification%20and%20sample%20assessments/AS_Chemistry_2015_Specification.pdf
Views: 55640 Freesciencelessons
Part 21: Mass Spectrometry - Fragmentation and Interpretation | Ethanol | Benzaldehyde
 
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Fragmentation in Mass Spectrometry, Interpretation in Mass Spectrometry, Fragmentation and Interpretation in Mass Spectrometry, Fragmentation and Interpretation of Butane, Fragmentation and Interpretation of Ethanol, Fragmentation and Interpretation of Acetic Acid, Fragmentation and Interpretation of Benzaldehyde, Fragmentation and Interpretation of Hydrocarbon, Fragmentation and Interpretation of Alcohol, Fragmentation and Interpretation of Carboxylic acid, Fragmentation and Interpretation of Aldehyde, Fragmentation and Interpretation of Ketone
Views: 4142 Dr. Puspendra Classes
Mass Spectrometer - Interpreting Spectra
 
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A heavy topic but a one which will gain you marks! Watch this video to find out how spectra can be interpreted when you have molecules. Find out how to identify fragments and the need for high resolution mass spectrometry and GC-MS.
Views: 66531 Allery Chemistry
How to interpret the result of Mass Spectrometer(MS)
 
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Mass spectrometer is used to identify the elements of the molecule
Organic Chemistry II - Solving a Structure Based on IR and NMR Spectra
 
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In this video I determine a plausible chemical structure for an organic compound based on the given IR and H NMR spectra. For a copy of the tables I used, click here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BwOceMKQTVFxRTh1Szl4aTh0eE0
Views: 182458 Tony St. John
Mass Spectrometry: Identifying the Molecular Ion
 
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Looks at the definition of the molecular ion and how to find it in a mass spectrum. Looks at Carbon, Chlorine, and Bromine isotope effects, the nitrogen rule, as well as what to do when the molecular ion doesn't show up.
Mass Spectrometry
 
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009 - Mass Spectrometry In this video Paul Andersen explains how a spectrometer was used to identify the presence of isotopes. This modified Dalton's original atomic theory because atoms of the same element had different masses. The functional parts of a mass spectrometer are detailed including the ionizer, mass analyzer and the detector. A simulation of Chlorine isotopes along with an average atomic mass calculation is included. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "File:John Dalton by Charles Turner.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 2, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:John_Dalton_by_Charles_Turner.jpg. "File:Myoglobin.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 5, 2013. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Myoglobin.png. "File:Peptide-Figure-Revised.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 5, 2013. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Peptide-Figure-Revised.png. File:WidmoMS.gif, n.d. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:WidmoMS.gif.
Views: 262964 Bozeman Science
Mass Spectrometry MS
 
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An education video on Mass Spectrometry using a magnetic sector instrument from the Royal Society of Chemistry. From the Modern Instrumental Techniques for schools and colleges DVD. For more information on the Chemistry for our Future programme please visit http://www.rsc.org/CFOF (C) Royal Society of Chemistry
A Brief Introduction to Mass Spectrometry
 
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A brief overview of a simple EI-mode mass spectrometry experiment.
Views: 191809 ChemSurvival
Mass Spectrometry Fragmentation Part 1
 
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Visit our website for the notes of this lecture: https://knowbeetutoring.wordpress.com/ Get private tutoring from anywhere in the world, via your computer, from this instructor. He offers help in Organic Chemistry, General Chemistry, Physics, MCAT, PCAT, and DAT. SUBMIT AN MCAT PROBLEM AND I WILL SHOW YOU HOW TO SOLVE IT VIA VIDEO. FREE. VISIT WEBSITE FOR DETAILS. https://knowbeetutoring.wordpress.com/
Views: 168986 Knowbee
Mass Spectrometry - Fragmentation
 
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See more videos at: http://talkboard.com.au/ In this video, we look at the idea of fragmentation in mass spectrometry. We examine how fragmentation can occur repeatedly with a given substance, and how it helps us to breakdown the structure of a molecule.
Views: 125621 talkboard.com.au
Mass spectrometry part 5: Graph analysis
 
17:40
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 42912 Shomu's Biology
Mass Spectrometry | Principle and Instrumentation | Velocity Selector
 
13:59
Mass Spectrometry in Hindi, Mass Spectrometry Principle, Mass Spectrum Interpretation, Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation, Mass Spectrometry Lecture, Mass Spectrometry, Types of Mass spectrometry, Velocity selector, ionization in mass spectrometry, velocity selector mass spectrometer This lecture explains about the instrumentation, principle of mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that ionizes chemical species and sorts the ions based on their mass-to-charge ratio. In simpler terms, a mass spectrum measures the masses within a sample. Mass spectrometry is used in many different fields and is applied to pure samples as well as complex mixtures. A mass spectrum is a plot of the ion signal as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. These spectra are used to determine the elemental or isotopic signature of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules and other chemical compounds. Article source: wikipedia Please SHARE with all your friends , SUPPORT and SUBSCRIBE to this channel ! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU91ilky-nR0VwKYFmJTsUA?sub_confirmation=1 HPLC Chromatography: https://youtu.be/9P_SIiMheZk UV Visible Spectroscopy: https://youtu.be/1mrUHrZ-0zk #BaaYo
Views: 30805 BaaYo
Mass spectrometry part 1 : introduction
 
24:09
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 239105 Shomu's Biology
2.2 The Mass Spectrometer
 
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The Mass Spectrometer. How it works, and a couple simple related exercisese.
Views: 163754 Evagating
Analyzing Mass Spec Data
 
08:01
Instructions for installing MNova: http://youtu.be/P-b7lWMcOqY Troubleshooting: WFU Users: If a license related error pops up upon opening MNova, see the Download and Run MestReNova.reg section of the Installing MNova video (link above). Produced and edited by Jason Pifer
Views: 18614 Wake Forest Chemistry
Mass Spectrometry Intro (ESI)
 
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Discusses how to interpret a mass spectrum (instruction for beginners)
Views: 2538 acr92651
Fundamentals of Mass Spectrometry (MS) (1 of 7) - Electrospray Ionisation
 
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Helen Yates at Waters Corporation briefly explains the process of ion formation when using an electrospray ionisation technique for mass spectrometry analysis.
Views: 43070 Waters Corporation
Mass spectrometry part 3 : protein analysis (step by step process)
 
35:56
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 69075 Shomu's Biology
Mass Spectrometry Organic Compounds
 
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Description of how mass spectra of organic compounds are used to determine the Mr and how fragment peaks enable the analytical chemist to build up a picture of the molecule
Views: 18043 MaChemGuy
Calculating Relative Atomic Mass from Mass Spectra
 
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A look at how the relative atomic mass can be calculated from Mass Spectra. 2 examples are given that commonly appear in A Level Chemistry exams.
Views: 40179 Allery Chemistry
Introduction to Ionization and Fragmentation in Mass Spectrometry
 
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Professor Davis uses pentane to demonstrate the electron impact ionization process and fragmentation patterns in mass spectrometry of alkanes
Views: 86505 ChemSurvival
Faster, Easier, and Better Biopharmaceutical Intact Mass Analysis
 
04:50
Biopharmaceutical Intact Mass Analysis has traditionally been challenging, and required sample preparation or analysis techniques which led to lengthy data interpretation or results which didn't mirror the actual protein in its native form. Find out how Thermo Scientific provides the ability to not only acquire the highest quality native intact mass data, providing full structural insights, but also perform sub-unit and peptide mapping analyses on a single system.
LC-MS/MS for Bioanalytical Peptide and Protein Quantification: MS Considerations
 
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Caitlin Dunning, Waters Associate Scientist, discusses how to use mass spectrometry to develop sensitive, selective, and robust quantification methods for peptide and protein quantification. http://www.waters.com/dmpk
Views: 14469 Waters Corporation
Part 20: Mass Spectrometry - Nitrogen Rule
 
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Nitrogen Rule in Mass Spectrometry, Interpretation of Mass Spectrum
Views: 4525 Dr. Puspendra Classes
Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Proteins and Peptides (CHE)
 
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Subject : Chemistry Paper : Bio-organic and Bio-physical Chemistry
Views: 1676 Vidya-mitra
023-Mass Spectroscopy
 
04:43
Brief overview of mass spectroscopy
Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry
 
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Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry, or GC/MS, is an analytical technique used in a variety of different forensic disciplines; for example, drug chemistry, toxicology, and trace chemistry. Learn all about it right here! Visit NFSTC at http://www.nfstc.org
Views: 68863 NFSTC at FIU
BroadE: Interpretation and automated analysis of proteomic data
 
50:39
Copyright Broad Institute, 2013. All rights reserved. The presentation above was filmed during the 2012 Proteomics Workshop, part of the BroadE Workshop series. The Proteomics Workshop provides a working knowledge of what proteomics is and how it can accelerate biologists' and clinicians' research. The focus of the workshop is on the most important technologies and experimental approaches used in modern mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics.
Views: 14721 Broad Institute
Theory of MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry
 
08:38
Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) Time of Flight (TOF) Mass Spectrometry is a versatile method used to analyze the composition of biomolecules and other organic macromolecules. This video is an introduction to the theory of MALDI-TOF spectrometry, including the ionization and detection process, as well as some advantages of MALDI compared with other ionization methods. http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/MALDIEducation “MALDI-based Research-like Experiences in a 2YC/4YC Collaboration with a Renewable Fuels Industry Partner” NSF ATE #1400885
Views: 103101 ARCC Chem
Mass Spectrometry Tutorial: How to Tune Your Analytes
 
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Why is it important to tune your analytes in house on your mass spectrometer? Danielle Moore, Field Applications Scientist, walks you through the process of tuning your analytes on a SCIEX Triple Quad 4500 mass spectrometer, starting at compound infusion taking you all the way to saving your data. To read the article visit: https://phenomenex.blog/2018/01/18/mass-spectrometer-tutorial/ Any questions, chat with our Technical Experts at www.phenomenex.com/chat.
Views: 10497 Phenomenex
Mass spectral interpretation practice problem
 
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This is the third lesson in interpreting mass spectra.
Views: 3786 Gary Mabbott
Day 5 Session 11 QC GCMS Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry
 
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Excerpts from the session on Quality Control and Analysis of perfume. Introduction to QC GCMS Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. A method of separating and analysing perfume, flavours and volatile mixtures for quality control, research and 'matching'. The Art & Technology of Perfumery Workshop March 2012. Lecturer: Stephen V. Dowthwaite, PerfumersWorld with students who have traveled to Bangkok for the course from UK, Oman, Indonesia, France, Singapore, New Zealand, India, Poland, Japan, South Africa, Australia and USA.
Views: 69339 PerfumersWorld
IR Infrared Spectroscopy Review - 15 Practice Problems - Signal, Shape, Intensity, Functional Groups
 
54:17
This organic chemistry video tutorial provides a review of IR Infrared Spectroscopy and how you can use it to distinguish one molecule from another according to their functional groups. This video contains plenty of lecture notes as well as a few multiple choice practice problems that will help you for your next organic chemistry test or exam. Here's the link for the complete video: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/irspectroscopyreview General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5vjCqnVb6s&index=1&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BU3gxU8RwqkEET2ilZ80Znj Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics covered in this video: 1. Introduction to IR Spectroscopy 2. Absorption of IR energy - Molecular Vibrations - Stretching, Compression, & Bending 3. Concept of Transmittance and Absorbance 4. Relationship Between Wavelength, Wavenumber cm^-1, Frequency, and Energy 5. Signal Characteristics Shape: Broad vs Sharp 6. Signal Intensity: Weak, Medium, or Strong 7. The effect of hydrogen bonding and bond polarity on signal shape and intensity 8. Diagnostic / Functional Group Region vs Fingerprint Region 9. The Relationship Between The Mass of the Atom and The Wavenumber 10. Relationship Between Bond Strength and Wavenumber 11. The Effect of Conjugation on IR Frequency Absorption 12. IR Spectrum For Alkanes, Alkenes, & Alkynes 13. IR Spectrum of an Internal Alkyne vs a Terminal Alkyne 14. IR Active vs IR Inactive Compounds - Symmetrical & Assymetrical Bonds 15. Electric Field, Force, & Dipole Moments - IR Bond Stretch vs Compression 16. IR Spectrum of a Carboxylic Acid vs an Alcohol - OH Stretch 17. IR Spectrum of Aldehydes & Ketones: C=O Carbonyl Stretch @ 1700 cm^-1 18. IR Graph of Esters and Ethers: C-O Stretch @ 1000 to 1300. Sp2 vs Sp3 Hybridized Carbon 19. IR Graph of Primary and Secondary Amines: Single vs Double Peak at 3300 & 3400 cm^-1 Symmetric and Assymetric Stretching of NH2 Hydrogen Atoms. 20. IR Spectrum of Amides & Nitriles 21. Carbonyl C=O Stretch - Resonance Electron Donating Groups vs Inductive Electron Withdrawing Groups 22. IR Spectrum of Aromatic Benzene Ring Derivatives C=C & =CH Stretch