Home
Search results “Limericks funny edward lear”
Limericks By Edward Lear - Part 1
 
04:33
More information and images can be found on our website: http://talesofcuriosity.com/v/Edward_Lear_Limericks_1/ For those interested below are all the words to each limerick, in the order that they appear. They first appeared in "A Book of Nonsense" by Edward Lear There was an Old Derry down Derry, Who loved to see little folks merry; So he made them a Book, And with laughter they shook At the fun of that Derry down Derry. There was an Old Man with a nose, Who said, "If you choose to suppose, That my nose is too long, You are certainly wrong!" That remarkable Man with a nose. There was an Old Man on some rocks, Who shut his wife up in a box; When she said, "Let me out," He exclaimed, "Without doubt, You will pass all your life in that box." There was a Young Person of Smyrna, Whose Grandmother threatened to burn her; But she seized on the Cat, And said, "Granny, burn that! "You incongruous Old Woman of Smyrna!" There was an Old Person of Rheims, Who was troubled with horrible dreams; So, to keep him awake, They fed him with cake, Which amused that Old Person of Rheims. There was an Old Man on a hill, Who seldom, if ever, stood still; He ran up and down, In his Grandmother's gown, Which adorned that Old Man on a hill. There was an Old Man of Leghorn, The smallest as ever was born; But quickly snapt up he, Was once by a puppy, Who devoured that Old Man of Leghorn. There was an Old Person of Chili, Whose conduct was painful and silly; He sate on the stairs, Eating apples and pears, That imprudent Old Person of Chili. There was an Old Man in a pew, Whose waistcoat was spotted with blue; But he tore it in pieces, To give to his nieces,— That cheerful Old Man in a pew. There was an Old Man with a gong, Who bumped at it all the day long; But they called out, "O law! You're a horrid old bore!" So they smashed that Old Man with a gong. There was an Old Man of Kilkenny, Who never had more than a penny; He spent all that money, In onions and honey, That wayward Old Man of Kilkenny. There was an Old Man who said, "How, ... Shall I flee from this horrible Cow? I will sit on this stile, And continue to smile, Which may soften the heart of that Cow." There was an Old Man of Columbia, Who was thirsty, and called out for some beer; But they brought it quite hot, In a small copper pot, Which disgusted that man of Columbia. There was a Young Lady of Troy, Whom several large flies did annoy; Some she killed with a thump, Some she drowned at the pump, And some she took with her to Troy. There was an Old Man in a tree, Who was horribly bored by a Bee; When they said, "Does it buzz?" He replied, "Yes, it does! "It's a regular brute of a Bee!" There was a Young Lady of Hull, Who was chased by a virulent Bull; But she seized on a spade, And called out—"Who's afraid!" Which distracted that virulent Bull. There was an Old Lady of Chertsey, Who made a remarkable curtsey; She twirled round and round, Till she sunk underground, Which distressed all the people of Chertsey. There was an old person of Dutton, Whose head was so small as a button; So to make it look big, He purchased a wig, And rapidly rushed about Dutton.
Views: 24231 Mark Warner
A Book of Nonsense by Edward Lear - FULL Audio Book - Children's Stories & Nonsensical Humor
 
28:20
A Book of Nonsense by Edward Lear - FULL Audio Book - Children's Stories & Humor - In 1846 Edward Lear published A Book of Nonsense, a volume of limericks that went through three editions and helped popularize the form. This book contains 112 of these funny, imaginative verses that have been well loved by many generations of children (and adults). ( Summary by Phil Chenevert ) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - READ along by clicking (CC) for Transcript Captions! - LISTEN to this entire audio book reading for free! Chapter listing and length: Chapter 01 -- 00:05:36 Chapter 02 -- 00:04:36 Chapter 03 -- 00:05:09 Chapter 04 -- 00:05:37 Chapter 05 -- 00:07:14 More about the author, Edward Lear - Edward Lear (12 May 1812 -- 29 January 1888) was a British artist, illustrator, author, and poet, renowned today primarily for his literary nonsense, in poetry and prose, and especially his limericks, a form that he popularized. From childhood he suffered ill health, including epilepsy, of which he was ashamed, and depression. He traveled widely over much of his life before settling in Sanremo. He never managed to marry, though he did propose it, but he had good friends and doted on his cat. When, after a long decline in health, he died of heart disease, sadly, none of his friends were able to attend his funeral. His principal areas of work as an artist were threefold: as a draughtsman employed to illustrate birds and animals; making coloured drawings during his journeys, which he reworked later, sometimes as plates for his travel books; as a (largely frustrated) illustrator of Tennyson's poems. As an author, Lear is principally known for his popular nonsense works, rather than as a travel writer. These show a great ability to use with relish the sound of real and invented English words. He was particularly adept at surprising his readers, and, in his limericks, had a genius for doing so without resorting to shocking them. (summary from wikipedia.org) Total running time: 0:28:12 Read by Phil Chenevert In addition to the reader, this audio book was produced by: Dedicated Proof-Listener: Elli Meta-Coordinator/Cataloging: Nadine Eckert-Boulet This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more info of the volunteer visit librivox.org.
Views: 27361 Greatest AudioBooks
Edward Lear ~ 5 limericks ~ There Was An Old Man .....
 
02:07
I am hoping to eventually upload several videos each with 5 of Edward Lear's limericks, read by me. Read by Jean Aked
Views: 8782 jeana1001
Limericks By Edward Lear - Part 2
 
04:45
More information and images can be found on our website: http://talesofcuriosity.com/v/Edward_Lear_Limericks_2/ For those interested below are all the words to each limerick, in the order that they appear. They first appeared in "A Book of Nonsense" by Edward Lear There was an Old Man with a flute, A sarpint ran into his boot; But he played day and night, Till the sarpint took flight, And avoided that man with a flute. There was a Young Lady of Russia, Who screamed so that no one could hush her; Her screams were extreme, No one heard such a scream, As was screamed by that Lady of Russia. There was a Young lady of Portugal, Whose ideas were excessively nautical; She climbed up a tree, To examine the sea, But declared she would never leave Portugal. There was a Young Lady of Tyre, Who swept the loud chords of a lyre; At the sound of each sweep, She enraptured the deep, And enchanted the city of Tyre. There was an Old Person of Ischia, Whose conduct grew friskier and friskier; He danced hornpipes and jigs, And ate thousands of figs, That lively Old Person of Ischia. There was an Old Person of Bangor, Whose face was distorted with anger; He tore off his boots, And subsisted on roots, That borascible person of Bangor. There was an Old Man of Vienna, Who lived upon Tincture of Senna; When that did not agree, He took Camomile Tea, That nasty Old Man of Vienna. There was an Old Man of the East, Who gave all his children a feast; But they all ate so much, And their conduct was such, That it killed that Old Man of the East. There was an Old Man in a boat, Who said, "I'm afloat! I'm afloat!" When they said, "No! you ain't!" He was ready to faint, That unhappy Old Man in a boat. There was an Old Man of the Coast, Who placidly sat on a post; But when it was cold, He relinquished his hold, And called for some hot buttered toast. There was an Old Person of Buda, Whose conduct grew ruder and ruder; Till at last, with a hammer, They silenced his clamour, By smashing that Person of Buda There was an Old Man of Kamschatka, Who possessed a remarkably fat cur, His gait and his waddle, Were held as a model, To all the fat dogs in Kamschatka. There was an Old Man of Moldavia, Who had the most curious behaviour; For while he was able, He slept on a table, That funny Old Man of Moldavia There was an Old Person of Gretna, Who rushed down the crater of Etna; When they said, "Is it hot?" He replied, "No, it's not!" That mendacious Old Person of Gretna. There was an Old Person of Hurst, Who drank when he was not athirst; When they said, "You'll grow fatter," He answered, "What matter?" That globular Person of Hurst. There was an Old Man with a beard, Who sat on a horse when he reared; But they said, "Never mind! You will fall off behind, You propitious Old Man with a beard!" There was an Old Man of Madras, Who rode on a cream-coloured ass; But the length of its ears, So promoted his fears, That it killed that Old Man of Madras. There was an Old Man of Berlin, Whose form was uncommonly thin; Till he once, by mistake, Was mixed up in a cake, So they baked that Old Man of Berlin.
Views: 11676 Mark Warner
Guess the last line of the limerick - QI: Series L Episode 3 Preview - BBC Two
 
03:11
SUBSCRIBE to the OFFICIAL BBC YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2IXqEIn LAUNCH BBC iPlayer to access Live TV and Box Sets: https://bbc.in/2J18jYJ Programme website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04lssh0 Alan Davies, Lloyd Langford, Victoria Coren and Jack Whitehall talk about limericks. Alan becomes angry at how bad Edward Lear's limericks where
Views: 285302 BBC
Fun & Easy English with Poems: THE LIMERICK
 
15:42
You might think poetry is difficult to understand, but think again! I will introduce you to the limerick. This short, funny form of poetry is a verse of five lines, in which some of the lines rhyme with each other. Watch the lesson, and you will learn about rhyme and rhythm. I’ll show you a few examples and explain the rules. The best part? The rules can be broken! I hope this will inspire you to write a limerick of your own. Try writing one in the comments. NEXT, watch this video about another poem: 1. Learn English with a poem: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVidL1o28gw 2. Learn to write poetry: THE HAIKU: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhIE4Dw6HKc TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today we have a lesson on a particular type of comic poem, which is called a limerick. Okay? So, these are some examples of limericks, and they're a very popular form of poem. They're usually very simple; they're not, like, difficult poetry that's hard to understand. They usually tell a story and it's usually quite funny; sometimes it's a bit crazy, kind of what you call nonsense poetry. It doesn't really make sense, but it's funny anyway. So, okay. So, to begin with the first example, it's a nursery rhyme, which is the kind of poem that children learn and listen to as they're children in the nursery where they're... When people used to have big houses, they would have one room which was called the nursery and they put their children in there, and they might have somebody to look after the children, like a nanny or a nurse. And... As well as the mother and father, the children would have other people to help to look after them and bring them up, and make food for them, and so on. That's if they were rich. But also children of all sorts. I remember, as a child, hearing nursery rhymes, and my mother especially telling me nursery rhymes. And the fun thing about them is that they have a rhythm and a rhyme, so there's a pattern, which children enjoy hearing the pattern of the rhythm and the rhyming of the ends of the lines. So, here's a nursery rhyme which you may have heard. Perhaps you have a version of it in your own language, if English isn't your first language. So, some of the words don't really make sense because they're more to do with imitating the sound of a clock ticking. So, here we go: Hickory dickory dock The mouse ran up the clock The clock struck one The mouse ran down Hickory dickory dock. So, it's... It's a clock, there's a mouse. The mouse goes up the clock, the clock chimes one: "Dong", and because of that, the mouse is frightened and runs down again. And then that's it - that's all that happens, but it's quite fun for children to hear that. So, you can see that there's a pattern, there: "dock" and "clock" rhyme, and then we have "dock" again. So, if we use a sort of letter form of rhyme scheme, you can label that A, like that. That's rhyme A. And then one is... Doesn't rhyme, so that's B. "One" and... Usually... Usually the third and fourth lines rhyme. These don't exactly rhyme, but they're a little bit similar. "One" and "down", and it's sort of what's called a half rhyme. So, it's a kind of... You could call it B again, really, or B with a little one on it just to show it's slightly different. But, anyway, this is... This sort of shows what the pattern is: A, A, B, B, A is the rhyme pattern for a limerick. And, also, the first two lines and the fifth lines are usually a bit longer than the lines three and four. So: "Hickory dickory dock, The mouse ran up the clock" so that's, like, three strong beats. "Hickory dickory dock, The mouse ran up the clock". But then we've got: "The clock struck one", so that's only two strong beats. "The clock struck one, The mouse ran down, Hickory dickory dock". So, it's that sort of rhythm; 3, 3, 2, 2, 3. So, that kind of pattern of rhythm and rhyme you find in most limericks. Okay? So, I hope you... I mean, "Hickory dickory dock", that's just imitating the sound of the clock. So, don't worry about: "What are those words? What do they mean?" They don't really mean anything, but the mouse-little animal-ran up the clock - it's a clock up on the wall, so... Or it's a clock... Big, tall clock that stands on the floor, so a mouse could run up it. "The clock struck one". "To strike"... "To strike" is when the clock chimes. To strike; to chime. If it goes: "Ding" or "Bong", anything like that, one sound to show that it's one o'clock; it just makes one single sound for one o'clock. "The clock struck one". Usually strikes because it's hitting something inside to make that sound. "The mouse ran down, Hickory dickory dock". So that's... That's it. Okay. So, that illustrates the pattern. And then we have an example from the 19th century. If you've seen another lesson that I did called: "The Owl and the Pussycat", you might remember the name of the poet, Edward Lear, who wrote a lot of funny poetry. […]
Limericks for Kids
 
08:14
Limericks are AWESOME! In this video for kids learn all about limericks and see why limericks are so much fun! Learn what makes a limerick a limerick, and find out who was the "Father of Limericks". ❤ Homeschool Pop? Join our team and get tattoos here: http://homeschoolpop.com ☃ You are SO cool! Say hello below, we would love to hear from you! Thanks for watching this Homeschool Pop language arts video on limericks for kids! Thanks again and we hope to see you next video!! Homeschool Pop Team Limericks for Kids
Views: 17281 Homeschool Pop
Limerick Poems for Kids | Classroom Poetry Video
 
06:32
Learn all about limerick poems! In this learning video for kids, learn all about the silliest type of poetry. Perfect for the classroom and for home, this video will help you understand limericks and teach you how to write your very own limerick poems! ❤ Homeschool Pop? Join our team and get tattoos here: http://homeschoolpop.com ☃ You are SO cool! Say hello below, we would love to hear from you! Thanks for watching this classroom edition of the limerick learning video! We hope you have fun writing your very own limericks! We are so happy you took some time today to spend time with us! Hope to see you next video. You are AWESOME (◕‿◕) Homeschool Pop Team Limerick Poems for Kids | Classroom Poetry Video
Views: 54005 Homeschool Pop
Limericks - 'Isles' by Edward Lear
 
00:49
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Have fun creating your own!
An Introduction to Edward Lear's Limericks
 
08:44
Learn a bit more about the man who popularized the limerick form, as well as about what makes his limericks unique. For more information, please visit http://www.natureofwriting.com/limericks/ Note: All images used in this video are in the public domain.
Limericks by Edward Lear (V.M.).wmv
 
09:55
Power Point Show converted to WMV. Limericks and music.
Views: 2186 Valeriu Margescu
Limericks by Edward Lear (St. Patrick's Day)
 
00:59
Loving2Learn.com is SO much fun! Loving2Read.com makes learning a breeze!
Views: 3667 Loving2Learn
Limericks By Edward Lear - Part 6
 
04:50
More information and images can be found on our website: http://talesofcuriosity.com/v/Edward_Lear_Limericks_6/ For those interested below are all the words to each limerick, in the order that they appear. They first appeared in "A Book of Nonsense" by Edward Lear There was a Young Lady whose chin, Resembled the point of a pin: So she had it made sharp, And purchased a harp, And played several tunes with her chin. There was an Old Man who said, "Hush! I perceive a young bird in this bush!" When they said—"Is it small?" He replied—"Not at all! It is four times as big as the bush!" There was an Old Man of the Cape, Who possessed a large Barbary Ape; Till the Ape one dark night, Set the house on a light, Which burned that Old Man of the Cape. There was a Young Lady whose nose, Was so long that it reached to her toes; So she hired an Old Lady, Whose conduct was steady, To carry that wonderful nose. There was an Old Person of Troy, Whose drink was warm brandy and soy; Which he took with a spoon, By the light of the moon, In sight of the city of Troy. There was a Young person of Crete, Whose toilette was far from complete; She dressed in a sack, Spickle-speckled with black, That ombliferous person of Crete. There was an Old Person of Mold, Who shrank from sensations of cold; So he purchased some muffs, Some furs and some fluffs, And wrapped himself from the cold. There was a Young Lady of Clare, Who was sadly pursued by a bear; When she found she was tired, She abruptly expired, That unfortunate Lady of Clare. There was an Old Person of Ewell, Who chiefly subsisted on gruel; But to make it more nice, He inserted some mice, Which refreshed that Old Person of Ewell. There was an old Man of Bohemia, Whose daughter was christened Euphemia; Till one day, to his grief, She married a thief, Which grieved that old Man of Bohemia. There was an Old Man of Corfu, Who never knew what he should do; So he rushed up and down, Till the sun made him brown, That bewildered Old Man of Corfu. There was an Old Man of Peru, Who never knew what he should do; So he tore off his hair, And behaved like a bear, That intrinsic Old Man of Peru. There was an Old Man of Vesuvius, Who studied the works of Vitruvius; When the flames burnt his book, To drinking he took, That morbid Old Man of Vesuvius. There was an Old Man with a beard, Who said, "It is just as I feared!— Two Owls and a Hen, Four Larks and a Wren, Have all built their nests in my beard!" There was an Old Man of Dundee, Who frequented the top of a tree; When disturbed by the crows, He abruptly arose, And exclaimed, "I'll return to Dundee." There was a Young Lady whose eyes, Were unique as to colour and size; When she opened them wide, People all turned aside, And started away in surprise. There was an Old Lady whose folly, Induced her to sit in a holly; Whereon by a thorn, Her dress being torn, She quickly became melancholy. There was a Young Lady whose bonnet, Came untied when the birds sate upon it; But she said, "I don't care! All the birds in the air Are welcome to sit on my bonnet!" There was an Old Man of Marseilles, Whose daughters wore bottle-green veils; They caught several Fish, Which they put in a dish, And sent to their Pa at Marseilles. There was a Young Lady of Ryde, Whose shoe-strings were seldom untied; She purchased some clogs, And some small spotty dogs, And frequently walked about Ryde.
Views: 1735 Mark Warner
Limericks By Edward Lear - Part 5
 
04:51
More information and images can be found on our website: http://talesofcuriosity.com/v/Edward_Lear_Limericks_5/ For those interested below are all the words to each limerick, in the order that they appear. They first appeared in "A Book of Nonsense" by Edward Lear. There was an Old Person of Tring, Who embellished his nose with a ring; He gazed at the moon, Every evening in June, That ecstatic Old Person of Tring. There was a young Lady of Dorking, Who bought a large bonnet for walking; But its colour and size, So bedazzled her eyes, That she very soon went back to Dorking. There was an Old Man of Nepaul, From his horse had a terrible fall; But, though split quite in two, By some very strong glue, They mended that Man of Nepaul. There was an Old Man of Cape Horn, Who wished he had never been born; So he sat on a chair, Till he died of despair, That dolorous Man of Cape Horn. There was an Old Man of the Nile, Who sharpened his nails with a file; Till he cut off his thumbs, And said calmly, "This comes— Of sharpening one's nails with a file!" There was an old Man of th' Abruzzi, So blind that he couldn't his foot see; When they said, "That's your toe," He replied, "Is it so?" That doubtful old Man of th' Abruzzi. There was an Old Person of Cromer, Who stood on one leg to read Homer; When he found he grew stiff, He jumped over the cliff, Which concluded that Person of Cromer. There was an Old Man of Calcutta, Who perpetually ate bread and butter; Till a great bit of muffin, On which he was stuffing, Choked that horrid old man of Calcutta. There was an Old Man of the Hague, Whose ideas were excessively vague; He built a balloon, To examine the moon, That deluded Old Man of the Hague. There was an Old Person of Rhodes, Who strongly objected to toads; He paid several cousins, To catch them by dozens, That futile Old Person of Rhodes. There was an Old Man of the South, Who had an immoderate mouth; But in swallowing a dish, That was quite full of fish, He was choked, that Old Man of the South. There was an Old Person of Spain, Who hated all trouble and pain; So he sate on a chair, With his feet in the air, That umbrageous Old Person of Spain. There was an Old Man of Melrose, Who walked on the tips of his toes; But they said, "It ain't pleasant, To see you at present, You stupid Old Man of Melrose." There was an Old Man, who said, "Well! Will NOBODY answer this bell? I have pulled day and night, Till my hair has grown white, But nobody answers this bell!" There was an Old Man of the Dee, Who was sadly annoyed by a flea; When he said, "I will scratch it," They gave him a hatchet, Which grieved that Old Man of the Dee. There was an Old Man with an owl, Who continued to bother and howl; He sate on a rail, And imbibed bitter ale, Which refreshed that Old Man and his owl. There was a Young Lady of Lucca, Whose lovers completely forsook her; She ran up a tree, And said, "Fiddle-de-dee!" Which embarrassed the people of Lucca. There was an Old Man in a casement, Who held up his hands in amazement; When they said, "Sir, you'll fall!" He replied, "Not at all!" That incipient Old Man at a casement. There was an Old Man of Coblenz, The length of whose legs was immense; He went with one prance, From Turkey to France, That surprising Old Man of Coblenz.
Views: 1239 Mark Warner
The Life Of Edward Lear
 
05:57
For more information and images about this video please visit http://talesofcuriosity.com/v/Lear/. Beneath is abridged text from our site: In 1824, a young boy sat to have his silhouette drawn. He was the twentieth child of a London stockbroker, Jeremiah Lear & his wife Ann. The boy lived with his older sister, who taught him how to write & draw. His name was Edward Lear. Throughout his life Edward Lear was affected by ill health. He was epileptic & suffered from bouts of depression. He named his epileptic attacks "the Demon" & bouts of depression "the Morbids". For much of his life Edward Lear traveled widely, to paint & in search of warm weather for his poor health. Whilst still in his teens Lear earned a living teaching drawing & selling his own work. In 1830, Edward Lear was given permission by the Zoological Society of London to draw their parrots. When his illustrations of were published they were very well received. Lear had gained a reputation for his natural history work. Eventually a bird was named in honour of Edward Lear, it is called "Lear's Macaw" (Anodorhynchus Leari). In 1832 Lear was invited to Knowlsey Hall, to draw the zoological collection. This menagerie was large, with over twenty staff. The collection's owner was Lord Stanley, the 13th Earl of Derby, also President of the Zoological Society. Lear spent four years drawing the animals at Knowlsey Hall. Although an employee, Lear became a frequent guest at family events. His wit impressed Lord Stanley & he was invited to dine with Stanley, family & friends, rather than the servants. Edward Lear entertained the children with his humorous poems, jokes & sketches. This period at Knowlsey Hall changed Lear's life, as he met many people with influence, who would support his work. It also saw the end of his natural history illustrations. The close work needed, affected his eyes & health. Due to this, Edward Lear decided to start painting landscapes instead. In 1846, Edward Lear published "A Book Of Nonsense", using the name "Derry Down Derry". Lear dedicated the book to the children of Knowsley Hall. The book was a collection of limericks. Lear did not invent the limerick, as many people believe, but he popularized the verse form. In fact Lear never used the term limerick, instead he referred to his work as, "nonsense rhymes". Lear often used the word "runcible" in his poems. Runcible, is a nonsense word Edward Lear invented, it does not really mean anything. In the same year "A Book Of Nonsense" was published Edward Lear gave the young Queen Victoria twelve drawing lessons. He accidentally caused mayhem by not observing proper court protocol. In 1861 "A Book Of Nonsense" was published. This time it appeared under Edward Lear's real name. Buts some people believed the name "Edward Lear" was another made up name. The theory was the author was really Lord Stanley, the 13th Earl of Derby, whose name was also "Edward" & "Lear" was just an anagram for "Earl". The reason for this was the book's dedication: TO THE GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN, GRAND-NEPHEWS, & GRAND-NIECES OF EDWARD, 13th EARL OF DERBY, On one occasion, to prove the name "Edward Lear" was real & he was him, Lear showed a doubter his name written inside his hat. Over the years Edward Lear published other books of nonsense rhymes. In 1867, Lear wrote his most famous nonsense poem, "The Owl & The Pussycat". In 1871 Edward Lear settled in San Remo, Italy. With him came his Albanian "servant & friend" Giorgio Cocali, his companion for nearly thirty years. After Giorgio Cocali's death his sons would carry on working for Lear. In 1872 there was a new arrival in Edward Lear's life, a cat named Foss. Foss had only half a tail. A servant had cut it off thinking only having half a tail would would stop Foss from straying. He was a large tabby cat with stripes a bit like a tiger. Lear doted on Foss, who apparently was not the most attractive of beasts. It was said when Lear built a new house, it was identical to his old one. The reason being Foss would settle in easily. The original house had lost its views after a hotel was built. The new house was close to the sea, where Lear said "nothing could interrupt his light until the fishes built". One of Edward Lear's friends was the poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson. He named the new home "Villa Tennyson". Here Edward Lear & Foss lived a quiet life. Lear became reclusive often, hiding away from visitors. On 26th September 1886 Foss died. After a ceremony he was buried under a tombstone in Lear's garden. On 29th January 1888, Edward Lear died of heart disease, his health had been in decline for sometime. He was laid to rest in a simple grave next to a monument to his servant Giorgio Cocali & his son Nicola Cocali's grave. The funeral was a quiet ceremony, as most of his acquaintances could not attend. Thus we end our tale, & bid a fond farewell to both Mr Lear & Foss, his cat.
Views: 10400 Mark Warner
Limericks by Edward Lear  (St. Patrick's Day)
 
00:47
Loving2Learn.com is SO much fun! Loving2Read.com makes learning a breeze!
Views: 125 Loving2Learn
Some Limericks Edward Lear Audiobook
 
02:00
Some Limericks Edward Lear Audiobook Edward Lear (12 or 13 May 1812[1][2] – 29 January 1888) was an English artist, illustrator, musician, author and poet, and is known now mostly for his literary nonsense in poetry and prose and especially his limericks, a form he popularised. His principal areas of work as an artist were threefold: as a draughtsman employed to illustrate birds and animals; making coloured drawings during his journeys, which he reworked later, sometimes as plates for his travel books; as a (minor) illustrator of Alfred Tennyson's poems. As an author, he is known principally for his popular nonsense collections of poems, songs, short stories, botanical drawings, recipes, and alphabets. He also composed and published twelve musical settings of Tennyson's poetry. edward lear limericks edward lear biography edward lear paintings edward lear nonsense edward lear books edward lear hotel edward lear the jumblies edward lear illustrations edward lear poetry poetry websites edward lear poem poetry books edward lear artist edward lear quotes edward lear nonsense poems published poems poetry sites book of poems poetry online poems by edward lear limericks by edward lear book of nonsense poetry blogs poetry for kids good poems book of poetry collection of poems poem of the day poem websites british poetry a book of nonsense good poetry poetry contest poets and writers edward lear the owl and the pussycat free poems poetry poems poetry for children poetry and prose poetry book poetry foundation poems and poets poems of edward lear limerick by edward lear poems about love inspirational poems poetry submissions books of poetry poets the owl and the pussycat by edward lear edward lear wiki english poet english poems poems for children poetry society the book of nonsense children poems poetry archive poetry clothing poem books edward lear limerick edward lear hotel london christian poems literary poems new poetry literature poems biography of edward lear facts about edward lear poet edward lear lear edward poets and poems online poems the complete nonsense of edward lear all poems edward lear owl poetry english free poetry the owl and the pussycat edward lear about edward lear prose poems edward lear poems nonsense edward lear complete nonsense edward lear prints nonsense poems edward lear poems english edward lear beard book of nonsense edward lear poetry poetry literary nonsense the poetry poetry prose edward lear art edward lear limeryki a collection of poems edward lear parrots poetry in information about edward lear may poems edward lear drawings poetry search british poet a book of nonsense by edward lear english poets biography poems of nonsense poets edward lear a book of nonsense poems and poetry english poets and poems poems by a book of poems books of poems book poetry poems poetry nonsense book edward lear bio poetry and poems nonsense edward lear published poetry the poems poems by poets
Views: 592 Free Audio Books
Limericks - 'Portugal' by Edward Lear
 
00:52
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Have fun creating your own!
Three Limericks of Edward Lear
 
01:06
Three Limericks, by Edward Lear, read aloud by Brad Craft.
Views: 261 usedbuyer
Limericks by Edward Lear   (St. Patrick's Day)
 
00:57
Loving2Learn.com is SO much fun! Loving2Read.com makes learning a breeze!
Views: 602 Loving2Learn
There Was an Old Man With a Beard
 
01:03
A fun limerick by Edward Lear...set to a bluesy guitar vibe! Entertaining for children and grown ups; a great introduction for kids to classic poetry and literature. Please subscribe to my channel if you enjoyed this video.
Views: 12792 dandelionden
Edward Lear ; Two Limericks
 
02:09
There Was and Old Man with a Beard and There Was an Old man in a Tree
Views: 32 Mr Smith
Limericks by Edward Lear (St. Patricks' Day)
 
00:58
Loving2Learn.com is SO much fun! Loving2Read.com makes learning a breeze!
Views: 1898 Loving2Learn
Edward Lear ~ 5 Limericks
 
01:58
Five Edward Lear limericks read by Jean Aked.
Views: 411 jeana1001
Limerick by Edward Lear (St. Patrick's Day Poetry)
 
00:57
Loving2Learn.com is SO much fun! Loving2Read.com makes learning a breeze!
Views: 428 Loving2Learn
Limerick by Edward Lear (St. Patrick's Day Poetry)
 
01:00
Loving2Learn.com is SO much fun! Loving2Read.com makes learning a breeze!
Views: 846 Loving2Learn
Limericks By Edward Lear - Part 3
 
04:53
More information and images can be found on our website: http://talesofcuriosity.com/v/Edward_Lear_Limericks_3/ For those interested below are all the words to each limerick, in the order that they appear. They first appeared in "A Book of Nonsense" by Edward Lear There was an old person of Dover, Who rushed through a field of blue Clover; But some very large bees, Stung his nose and his knees, So he very soon went back to Dover. There was an Old Man of the West, Who never could get any rest; So they set him to spin, On his nose find his chin, Which cured that Old Man of the West. There was an Old Person of Leeds, Whose head was infested with beads; She sat on a stool, And ate gooseberry fool, Which agreed with that person of Leeds. There was an Old Person of Cheadle, Was put in the stocks by the beadle; For stealing some pigs, Some coats, and some wigs, That horrible Person of Cheadle. There was an Old Person of Cadiz, Who was always polite to all ladies; But in handing his daughter, He fell into the water, Which drowned that Old Person of Cadiz. There was an Old Person of Anerley, Whose conduct was strange and unmannerly; He rushed down the Strand, With a Pig in each hand, But returned in the evening to Anerley. There was a Young Lady of Wales, Who caught a large fish without scales; When she lifted her hook, She exclaimed, "Only look!" That ecstatic Young Lady of Wales. There was an Old Man of the Isles, Whose face was pervaded with smiles; He sung high dum diddle, And played on the fiddle, That amiable Man of the Isles. There was an Old Person of Basing, Whose presence of mind was amazing; He purchased a steed, Which he rode at full speed, And escaped from the people of Basing. There was a Young Lady of Welling, Whose praise all the world was a-telling; She played on the harp, And caught several carp, That accomplished Young Lady of Welling. There was an Old Man who supposed, That the street door was partially closed; But some very large rats, Ate his coats and his hats, While that futile old gentleman dozed. There was an Old Person of Tartary, Who divided his jugular artery; But he screeched to his wife, And she said, "Oh, my life! Your death will be felt by all Tartary!" There was an Old Person whose habits, Induced him to feed upon Rabbits; When he'd eaten eighteen, He turned perfectly green, Upon which he relinquished those habits. There was an Old Man of Whitehaven, Who danced a quadrille with a Raven; But they said—"It's absurd, To encourage this bird!" So they smashed that Old Man of Whitehaven. There was an Old Man of the West, Who wore a pale plum-coloured vest; When they said, "Does it fit?" He replied, "Not a bit!" That uneasy Old Man of the West. There was a Young Lady of Sweden, Who went by the slow train to Weedon; When they cried, "Weedon Station!" She made no observation, But thought she should go back to Sweden. There was an Old Man of Marseilles, Whose daughters wore bottle-green veils; They caught several Fish, Which they put in a dish, And sent to their Pa' at Marseilles. There was an old Person of Chester, Whom several small children did pester; They threw some large stones, Which broke most of his bones, And displeased that old person of Chester. There was an Old Man of the Wrekin, Whose shoes made a horrible creaking; But they said, "Tell us whether, Your shoes are of leather, Or of what, you Old Man of the Wrekin?"
Views: 2599 Mark Warner
Limericks By Edward Lear  - Part 4
 
04:53
More information and images can be found on our website: http://talesofcuriosity.com/v/Edward_Lear_Limericks_4/ For those interested below are all the words to each limerick, in the order that they appear. They first appeared in "A Book of Nonsense" by Edward Lear There was an old Person of Burton, Whose answers were rather uncertain; When they said, "How d'ye do?" He replied, "Who are you?" That distressing old person of Burton. There was a Young Lady of Norway, Who casually sat in a doorway; When the door squeezed her flat, She exclaimed, "What of that?" This courageous Young Lady of Norway. There was an Old Person of Ems, Who casually fell in the Thames; And when he was found, They said he was drowned, That unlucky Old Person of Ems. There was an Old Man of Apulia, Whose conduct was very peculiar; He fed twenty sons, Upon nothing but buns, That whimsical Man of Apulia. There was a Young Girl of Majorca, Whose aunt was a very fast walker; She walked seventy miles, And leaped fifteen stiles, Which astonished that Girl of Majorca. There was an Old Man of Quebec, A beetle ran over his neck; But he cried, "With a needle, I'll slay you, O beadle!" That angry Old Man of Quebec. There was a Young Lady of Poole, Whose soup was excessively cool; So she put it to boil, By the aid of some oil, That ingenious Young Lady of Poole. There was a Young Lady of Bute, Who played on a silver-gilt flute; She played several jigs, To her uncle's white pigs, That amusing Young Lady of Bute. There was an Old Person of Prague, Who was suddenly seized with the plague; But they gave him some butter, Which caused him to mutter, And cured that Old Person of Prague. There was an Old Person of Philae, Whose conduct was scroobious and wily; He rushed up a Palm, When the weather was calm, And observed all the ruins of Philae. There was a Young Lady of Parma, Whose conduct grew calmer and calmer; When they said, "Are you dumb?" She merely said, "Hum!" That provoking Young Lady of Parma. There was an Old Man with a poker, Who painted his face with red oker; When they said, "You're a Guy!" He made no reply, But knocked them all down with his poker. There was an Old Person of Sparta, Who had twenty-five sons and one daughter; He fed them on snails, And weighed them in scales, That wonderful person of Sparta. There was an Old Lady of Prague, Whose language was horribly vague; When they said, "Are these caps?" She answered, "Perhaps!" That oracular Lady of Prague. There was an Old Man, on whose nose, Most birds of the air could repose; But they all flew away, At the closing of day, Which relieved that Old Man and his nose. There was an Old Man of Peru, Who watched his wife making a stew; But once by mistake, In a stove she did bake, That unfortunate Man of Peru. There was a Young Lady of Turkey, Who wept when the weather was murky; When the day turned out fine, She ceased to repine, That capricious Young Lady of Turkey. There was an Old Man of the North, Who fell into a basin of broth; But a laudable cook, Fished him out with a hook, Which saved that Old Man of the North. There was an Old Man of Aosta, Who possessed a large Cow, but he lost her; But they said, "Don't you see, She has rushed up a tree? You invidious Old Man of Aosta!"
Views: 1692 Mark Warner
Limericks - 'Prague' by Edward Lear
 
00:45
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Create your own!
Limericks - 'Pink' by Edward Lear
 
00:49
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Have fun creating your own!
Two Nonsense Poems By Edward Lear
 
04:28
For more information and images about this video please visit http://talesofcuriosity.com/v/LearPoems/. For those interested below are the words to the two poems: The Owl And The Pussycat The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea In a beautiful pea green boat, They took some honey, and plenty of money, Wrapped up in a five pound note. The Owl looked up to the stars above, And sang to a small guitar, 'O lovely Pussy! O Pussy my love, What a beautiful Pussy you are, You are, You are! What a beautiful Pussy you are!' Owl, Pussycat And The Pig Pussy said to the Owl, 'You elegant fowl! How charmingly sweet you sing! O let us be married! too long we have tarried: But what shall we do for a ring?' They sailed away, for a year and a day, To the land where the Bong-tree grows And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood With a ring at the end of his nose, His nose, His nose, With a ring at the end of his nose. Owl,Pussycat And The Turkey 'Dear pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling Your ring?' Said the Piggy, 'I will.' So they took it away, and were married next day By the Turkey who lives on the hill. They dined on mince, and slices of quince, Which they ate with a runcible spoon; And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand, They danced by the light of the moon, The moon, The moon, They danced by the light of the moon. The second poem is a self-portrait "How Pleasant To Know Mr. Lear!" How Pleasant To Know Mr. Lear! "How pleasant to know Mr. Lear!" Who has written such volumes of stuff! Some think him ill-tempered and queer, But a few think him pleasant enough. His mind is concrete and fastidious, His nose is remarkably big; His visage is more or less hideous, His beard it resembles a wig. Old Man And Beard He has ears, and two eyes, and ten fingers, Leastways if you reckon two thumbs; Long ago he was one of the singers, But now he is one of the dumbs. He sits in a beautiful parlor, With hundreds of books on the wall; He drinks a great deal of Marsala, But never gets tipsy at all. Edward Lear And His Hat He has many friends, lay men and clerical, Old Foss is the name of his cat; His body is perfectly spherical, He weareth a runcible hat. When he walks in waterproof white, The children run after him so! Calling out, "He's come out in his night- Gown, that crazy old Englishman, oh!" Edward Lear And Foss He weeps by the side of the ocean, He weeps on the top of the hill; He purchases pancakes and lotion, And chocolate shrimps from the mill. He reads, but he cannot speak, Spanish, He cannot abide ginger beer: Ere the days of his pilgrimage vanish, How pleasant to know Mr. Lear! Hope you enjoyed!!!!
Views: 5327 Mark Warner
More Limericks By Edward Lear - Part 1
 
03:01
More information and images can be found on our website: http://talesofcuriosity.com/v/More_Edward_Lear_Limericks_1/ For those interested below are the words to the limericks: There was a young person of Bantry, Who frequently slept in the pantry; When disturbed by the mice, She appeased them with rice, That judicious young person of Bantry. There was an Old Man at a Junction, Whose feelings were wrung with compunction When they said, "The Train's gone!" He exclaimed, "How forlorn!" But remained on the rails of the Junction. There was an old man of Ibreem, Who suddenly threaten'd to scream; But they said, "If you do, We will thump you quite blue, You disgusting old man of Ibreem!" There was an old person of Minety, Who purchased five hundred and ninety Large apples and pears, Which he threw unawares At the heads of the people of Minety. There was an old person of Wilts, Who constantly walked upon stilts; He wreathed them with lilies And daffy-down-dillies, That elegant person of Wilts. There was an old man of Thermopylae, Who never did anything properly; But they said, "If you choose To boil eggs in your shoes, You shall never remain in Thermopylae." There was an old person of Grange, Whose manners were scroobious and strange; He sailed to St. Blubb In a waterproof tub, That aquatic old person of Grange. There was an old person of Deal, Who in walking used only his heel; When they said, "Tell us why?" He made no reply, That mysterious old person of Deal. There was an old person of Newry, Whose manners were tinctured with fury; He tore all the rugs, And broke all the jugs, Within twenty miles' distance of Newry. There was an old man on the Humber, Who dined on a cake of Burnt Umber; When he said, "It's enough!" They only said, "Stuff! You amazing old man on the Humber!" There was an old man of Dumblane, Who greatly resembled a crane; But they said, "Is it wrong, Since your legs are so long, To request you won't stay in Dumblane?"
Views: 490 Mark Warner
A Limerick by Edward Lear
 
00:29
A limerick, by Edward Lear, read by Brad Craft. "There was an Old Man with a beard..."
Views: 4792 usedbuyer
Limericks - 'Rhodes' by Edward Lear
 
00:44
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Create your own!
Limericks - 'Nose' by Edward Lear
 
00:50
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Have fun creating your own!
Another Limerick by Edward Lear
 
00:27
Another limerick, by Edward Lear, read by Brad Craft.
Views: 244 usedbuyer
LIMERICKS - READ ALOUD read along rhymes for children
 
02:10
Limericks are funny poems that consist of five lines. This READ ALOUD (and read along, since text is provided) limerick video is suitable for the whole family and will have you laughing in no time. Limericks are special poems that can only be written by poets who can abide by the rules. The first, second, and fifth lines of the rhyme must have at least seven, but can have up to ten syllables, while rhyming and having the same verbal rhythm. The third and fourth lines of the poem must have at least five syllables, but can have up to seven syllables, and must rhyme with each other and have the same rhythm. In order to be a LIMERICK, there are plenty of rules to abide by. This video of rhymes for kids features: An old man in a tree An old man on some rocks An old man and a cow An old man and a bush An old man and a beard An old person and a bear A young lady dressed in blue A small boy from Quebec A young lady and a tiger A young maid with determination These limericks are the work of anonymous authors as well as Edward Lear and Rudyard Kipling, MUSIC CREDITS: The theme music for the children's video was created and recorded by Eddie Lewis of www.EddieLewis.com. ART CREDITS: The graphics for this video were created by Pearl Lewis (www.DrPearlLewis.com).
Views: 621 Evergreen Tales
How to Write a Limerick
 
01:42
Watch more How to Write Fiction & Poetry videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/383543-How-to-Write-a-Limerick There once was a girl with some time, who wanted badly to write rhyme. She checked out this site, and to her delight, she found writing limericks prime. Step 1: Read limericks Read other limericks to get an understanding of limericks. You can find collections of limericks at your local library or book store. Step 2: Understand the form Learn the limerick's form. A limerick is a five-line poem, usually witty or funny, where the last word of lines one, two, and five, which each have eight syllables, rhyme, and the last word of lines three and four, which each have five syllables, rhyme. Step 3: Write line one Write the first line, introducing a character or a location. The line should be eight syllables and the last word needs to rhyme with the last words of lines two and five. Don't end your first line with the word orange! Tip Remember, limericks are meant to be funny, so setting up your joke or idea strongly at the beginning helps the rest of the poem. Step 4: Write line two Begin line two. This line should introduce a plot. The last word must rhyme with the last word in line one and the line is again eight syllables. Step 5: Write lines three and four Construct lines three and four by thinking of two rhyming words that can serve as the last words of these two lines. These lines are five syllables and can introduce a problem, solution, or maybe just something that makes the story funny. Step 6: Write the final line Write your final line by reverting back to the format of lines one and two: eight syllables long with a last word that rhymes lines one and two. This line should wrap up your limerick, either wittily or humorously tightly. Step 7: Read aloud Read aloud to an audience and enjoy the feedback! Did You Know? Although collections of limericks date back to 1820, Edward Lear is often credited with popularizing the modern limerick in his Book of Nonsense first published in 1846.
Views: 150489 Howcast
Limericks - 'Norway' by Edward Lear
 
00:51
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Have fun creating your own!
Limericks by Edward Learn (St. Patrick's Day)
 
00:50
Loving2Learn.com is SO much fun! Loving2Read.com makes learning a breeze!
Views: 462 Loving2Learn
Limericks - 'Hague' by Edward Lear
 
00:48
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Create your own!
Limericks - 'Apulia' by Edward Lear
 
00:49
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Have fun creating your own!
Limericks - 'Coast' by Edward Lear
 
00:47
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Create your own!
English Poems: Edward Lear - A Book of Nonsense - 02 (лимерик)
 
00:29
Трудно изучать английский самостоятельно? Обратитесь к специалистам: http://bit.ly/2J3SgNn - репетиторы и курсы на любой вкус:) И подписывайтесь на второй канал "Английский язык в примерах": http://bit.ly/2TjGC4M Лимерики Эдварда Лира с переводом и произношением слов. Плейлист - https://goo.gl/cTqGaQ. Текстовая версия: http://www.englishbysongs.ru/index.php/glossaries-audiobooks/stikhi-dlya-detej-na-anglijskom/104-edward-lear-a-book-of-nonsense/2286-limerik-02 librivox.org – аудио Слова пронумерованы по частоте использования в языке (согласно словарю Collins): 1) - постоянно; 2) - очень часто; 3) - часто; 4) - редко; 5) - очень редко Фразы, словосочетания и некоторые составные слова нумеруются по самому редкому в них слову.
Limericks - 'Said#80' by Edward Lear
 
00:49
A limerick is a silly poem with five lines. They are often funny or nonsensical. The first, second and fifth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 8 or 9). The third and fourth lines rhyme with each other and have the same number of syllables (typically 5 or 6). Limericks often start with the line "There once was a..." or "There was a..." Create your own!
a poem on limericks
 
03:57
limerick were written by Edward lear
Views: 24 Zaheer hussain
Limerick Poems
 
02:54
How to write a limerick poem (Recorded with http://screencast-o-matic.com)
Views: 10160 Lauren Barnes
There Was an Old Man with a Beard by Edward Lear
 
00:53
Poem by Edward Lear, created and narrated by Anjie Carpenter for her second grade students at Palisades Episcopal School as part of the Core Knowledge Sequence of learning.
Views: 6864 Anjie Carpenter

Masturbation for young ones
Futbal spartak slovan online dating
Here!
Here!
Here!